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Managing Leashed Dog While Off-Leash Dogs Want to Visit

November 18, 2012

Dear Inquisitive Canine,

How do I handle the situation when I am walking my boxer on her leash and we are confronted by an off leash dog or two? It happens a lot in my neighborhood and my former street dog (she was rescued from a neglectful life of living on the streets of East Dallas) goes crazy and barks and lunges at the dogs. I have worked with her so she no longer lunges at dogs behind fences but she continues to go crazy at the off leash roamers.

Ellen G.

Dear Ellen,

Thank you for writing in! We appreciate questions such as these, since there are many in your walking shoes experiencing the same situation. The following are a few quick tips you can use to help with enjoying your leash-walks.

Poncho and Ferris Out for Walkies

Interrupt and redirect! It sounds as if you’re already initiating this dog training maneuver when encountering dogs behind fences – now you can take it a step further. An easy and fun game you can play is “Find it! All you have to do is say “find it” when she alerts to another dog, then toss a small treat on the ground in the direction you want your dog do walk. The intention of the game is to redirect her attention elsewhere while making it fun and rewarding – more than barking and lunging at the other dogs. (Using a treat she’d do backflips over would make an even bigger impact!) With proper timing and consistency she should begin to create an association of “other dogs” = “fun”! You’ll know she’s understanding the game when she sees another dog and then looks at you almost as if asking “Are we going to play now?”

If your inquisitive canine is more of an obedience expert, you can play the same game, but in leu of playing “find it”, you can run through her gamut of “tricks”. The principle is the same in that every time another dog appears life gets better for her!

Keep it loosey-goosey! Leashes can be restrictive when dogs are trying to communicate with others – dogs and people. However, they’re important when in areas he or she can run off and get hurt or harm something else. Plus, in many areas it’s the law. To allow your dog freedom of speech in her innate language with the other pooch’s, avoid tightening up on the leash. IF (and this is a big IF) it’s safe for her, for the other dog, okay with the other owner (if they’re around), the general public, an

Allow your dog to speak! Our domestic dogs have a language all their own. Allowing your dog the opportunity to speak her mind will help her convey her message to the other dog, and vice-versa. She might be using both her vocal and body language skills. Similar to when any two people are talking, especially in a language we’re not fluent in, it’s best to avoid interrupting. d you’re comfortable with it, drop the leash. Again, this allows her more control over her behavior – which we all want, right?

Learn to “speak dog”! In addition to allowing the dogs to communicate, you’ll want to take a foreign language course in “dog-talk”. This is helpful for watching your own pooch, as well as others you encounter – especially those who are unfamiliar. A dog whose body and face is relaxed and loose, tail wiggly-waggy in movement, mouth open with tongue possibly hanging out while walking towards you using a bouncy gait is more likely to be friendly. The complete opposite – body stiff, mouth closed with tense face, stiff gate, head downward but gazing towards you/your dog – is a dog you’d want to question – it doesn’t mean he or she would want to start a fight, but this type of language might be conveying more of a reserved greeting. When in doubt you can use the little trick of taking a handful of treats and tossing them at the other dog while you head off in another direction.

Paws and reflect: Make the experience fun and rewarding, versus stressful, and be prepared for what your plan of action is for those times you see another dog while on walks. Also, remember to allow your dog to speak her mind when other dogs are around.With time, practice and consistency, you can make the experience a walk in the park – or wherever your dogs leash takes you.


7 Responses to Managing Leashed Dog While Off-Leash Dogs Want to Visit

  1. Collin says:

    Wow! This is really great! Thanks for sharing this post to us. This is really informative and helpful about taking care of our pet dogs!

  2. Lana Brown says:

    Ellen, I must say the above provided in-depth information on properly managing leashed dog while off-leash dogs wants to visit is outstanding. This information is not only great for the questioner but also is very beneficial for every dog lover. The best tip for successful dog training according to me is to keep it loosey-goosey. This is an awesome idea for successful dog training.

  3. Refrigerate or freeze leftovers. Cooked parts can be stored for up to three days in the fridge or for a few months in the freezer. Most vegetables can be safely frozen. In general, vegetables and cottage cheese should be stored separately in the fridge and used before they spoil. Thanks.
    Regards,

  4. Julie says:

    This is great information! I am getting ready to adopt and I plan on walking where we might encounter some “stragglers” out on the trail. I realize that your emotions can transfer right down the leash and having something to distract both your dog and you by redirection will be helpful.

  5. Joan the Dog Coach says:

    Thanks for the accolades everyone! Glad you find the information useful! I still practice these skills myself – to keep them sharp – whether working with clients dogs, or my own sidekick :-) Happy training everyone!

  6. damian says:

    Thanks so much for sharing your “dog managing” tips. You’ve put some great information together here. It’s so comprehensive!

    • Joan the Dog Coach says:

      Thank you for the accolades Damian – we appreciate your feedback and are thrilled to hear you find out dog training tips helpful. Here’s to many fun outings with your inquisitive canine!

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